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Reclaiming our Mental Focus and Balance

By | Fine Tuning | No Comments

If it seems like it is over whelming, when the brain is racing and there seems to be an internal battle between the yearning for calm and rest and what feels like an out of control mental gymnastics competition, there is an open opportunity for magic.

Taking a step back, expanding our awareness and looking at the evolution of communication and the way in which we live our lives, there is a path with clear markers that lead straight to why we are where we are.

Before television and radio, options for mental stimulation were of a more paced and balanced nature.

Reading and writing lead the charge keeping the minds work at an organic pace.

Radio and television brought about the jelly brain, leaving no cooperation or partnership for the brain.

Now we could just shut off and have information chosen by a, key word, “programmer” pumped into our experience without any filter.

The brain would lay dormant becoming weak and prone to images and sounds that would create belief systems full of illusion and plant fresh seeds for compulsive consumerism and the degradation of personal self esteem.

While millions watched images of what people “should” look and act like, judgment of the self took on a whole new meaning.

Today we have the information super highway. We click and click and choose and click. images flash before our eyes scrambling the thought process at break neck speed. the average someone spends on a page is barley enough to even begin to know what is being shared.

This constant flow of information is to many, our life blood. it has shaped our world, the way we share, grow and are seen. it also needs to be respected.

Take a couple days every week away from your computer screen.

The new kill your tv is kill your search engine.

So much to reflect on.

So much beauty in this world…

See?

15 Styles of Distorted Thinking

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“Filtering: You take the negative details and magnify them while filtering out all positive aspects of a situation.

Polarized Thinking: Things are black or white, good or bad. You have to be perfect or you’re a failure. There is no middle ground.

Overgeneralization: You come to a general conclusion based on a single incident or piece of evidence. If something bad happens once you expect it to happen over and over again.

Mind Reading: Without their saying so, you know what people are feeling and why they act the way they do. In particular, you are able to divine how people are feeling toward you.

Castastrophizing: You expect disaster. you notice or hear about a problem and start “what if’s”. What if tragedy strikes? What if it happens to you?”

Personalization: Thinking that everything people do or say is some kind of reaction to you. You also compare yourself to others, trying to determine who’s smarter, better looking, etc.

Control Fallacies: If you feel externally controlled, you see yourself as helpless, a victim of fate. The fallacy of internal control has you responsible for the pain and happiness of everyone around you.

Fallacy of Fairness: You feel resentful because you think you know what’s fair but other people won’t agree with you.

Blaming: You hold other people responsible for your pain, or take the other tack and blame yourself for every problem or reversal.

Should: You have a list of ironclad rules about how you and other people should act. People who break the rules anger you and you feel guilty if you violate the rules.

Emotional Reasoning: You believe that what you feel must be true-automatically. If you feel stupid and boring, then you must be stupid and boring.

Fallacy of Change: You expect that other people will change to suit you if you just pressure or cajole them enough. You need to change people because your hope for happiness seem to depend entirely on them.

Global Labeling: You generalize one or two qualities into a negative global judgment.

Being Right: You are continually on trial to prove that your opinions and actions are correct. Being wrong is unthinkable and you will go to any length to demonstrate your rightness.

Heaven’s Reward Fallacy: You expect all your sacrifice and self-denial to pay off, as if there were someone keeping score. You feel better when the reward doesn’t come.”

-John M. Grohol, Psy.D.

Gratitude for this work!